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Circular Wonderings is an exploration of the role of digital, software and technology in the Circular Economy. Exploration is the key word here. I write regularly, reflecting on my current thoughts and research. Expect typos, incomplete thoughts, varied rambling topics and (hopefully) a journey towards clearer understanding and insight. Subscribe here to join my journey.

Reality

I will shortly need a new laptop. Been very happy with this one since 2015, and would be happy to continue for another year or two - but the battery is basically not charging anymore (can't replace the battery ), I'm experiencing one two many performance issues (upgrading is more expensive than purchasing new ) and I'm finally running out of space optimisation (again, SSD extremely hard to upgrade ).

It's depressing that 6 years is considered a long life time for a laptop .

But the really annoying and frustrating reality is that our amazingly powerful economy makes it depressingly difficult for me to buy what I want.

I want a high quality, modular and easy to repair and upgrade laptop - with the mix of power, lightness and battery life that fits with my lifestyle. I would willingly pay for the pleasure. I do not need the bleeding edge chips, form factor or gimmicky marketing video. I will actually pay more to bypass that nonsense and focus on what I really need. I really, really want the energy and materials in my laptop to not add to climate change or ruining the environment that I love to spend time in. And I especially want to be confident that my money is not funding things like conflict and child slavery [1].

Maybe the Framework laptop [2] will one day be the answer I am looking for.

In the meantime I am stuck with compromising either on the limited market for 'refurbished' laptops, or buying new and convincing myself that another six years justifies it.

People in my life describing shopping as a pleasurable experience. I find it difficult to describe how depressing it is for me.


[1]: https://www.happyporch.com/circular-wonderings/posts/2021/february/righteous-anger/
[2]: https://frame.work/